• Japanese Used Cars

Godfrey M. Ngoja from Tanzania message

Getting a car is an intricate process as there are so many factors to consider. Factors that can be daunting if proper research of the vehicle are not done. Everyone wants to make the most of what they pay for and wants to make sure that his or her car is of the best quality. There are a quite few makes of cars available with quality guaranteed but two of the major would be the American and Japanese made cars. Both are excellent car builders and provide good fuel efficiency vehicles that are cost efficient. However, there are some facts and details that can influence buyers to choose one make over the other, this includes: performance, reliability, and resale value.
Some American made cars are not built with the elegance of the Japanese …show more content…
Japanese cars have the incentive of having an accelerated performance system that gives their cars more power under the hood and therefore increases the speed. They tend to have a longer life span and repairing them is just as equal with the American made cars.

When it comes to reliability, for some reason, American cars are known for being unreliable. However, those who think that way probably live in the past. We know that American cars built 30-40 years ago, do not usually reach the 200k-mile mark, while the Japanese cars were hitting 250-300k. However, in this modern age, many of the American cars are reaching 200-250k miles easily. Also, most companies have lemons and recalls. Like, the 2006 Ford Fusion has a strut leaking problem and the 8th Gen Civic has a notorious tranny problem. Both American and Japanese cars have problems but some people still rely on Japanese cars. They believe that these cars are still reliable compared to the other one. That is the fact.

Resale values are determined by taking into consideration the equipment and options of a vehicle, the mileage, the condition, and the geographic area where the vehicle has been driven. It also pertains to what made and model of the vehicle is. Which is why many are aware that American cars compared to Japanese cars have less resale value. Both are somehow having the same features and specs however; Japanese cars tend to last longer because of its quality and how it is made.…
That is the fact.

Resale values are determined by taking into consideration the equipment and options of a vehicle, the mileage, the condition, and the geographic area where the vehicle has been driven. It also pertains to what made and model of the vehicle is. Which is why many are aware that American cars compared to Japanese cars have less resale value. Both are somehow having the same features and specs however; Japanese cars tend to last longer because of its quality and how it is made.…
That is the fact.

Japan has become the largest car-producing nation in the world. This follows their emergence as major competitors in the global automobile market and has been enabled by their increased innovativeness in technology, improved level of car performance and competitive pricing, among other factors.

In 2011, Japan has seen disruption like never before. Earthquakes and tsunamis have left the nation in turmoil. Although despite facing overwhelming disaster, Japanese manufacturers are known for their ability to improvise and adapt in times of hardship.

This paper will discuss and closely examine the rise and growth of Japan’s automobile industry to become the largest car-producing nation in the world. It also reviews how innovative policies have enabled this.

Introduction
Japan’s ability to produce popular, reliable, and affordable cars throughout the 1990s resulted in Japan becoming the largest car-producing nation in the world in 2000 (JAMA). This growth was led by passenger car exports and can be credited to various factors including; the improved performance of Japanese cars, due partly to the rise of technological levels of manufacturing; competitive pricing due to cost reductions that follow mass production; and the long-term market development strategies of Japanese manufacturers (JAMA).

In 2011, Japan has seen disruption like never before (Taylor,2011). Earthquakes and tsunamis have not only created direct damage, there are secondary effects. The impacts of the disaster have truly been felt globally, being felt as far as Europe.

Growth of the Industry

Japan’s postwar era officially ended in 1955, entering the first stage of long-term economic growth. Car purchases rose with this growth as personal income increased. By 1958, cars bought for personal use had doubled (54.5% of cars sold compared to 25.2% in 1955) with individual demand outweighing business demand for cars for the first time (JAMA).

Substantial cuts in prices made cars increasingly affordable, these were made possible through expansions and improvements in manufacturing operations and the establishment of a mass-marketing system (JAMA).

Special-purpose automatic transfer machines were the main focus in regards to investments in equipment. Manufacturers started concentrating on introducing these machines in 1955 and applied them in the creation of engine parts (JAMA). Each company also began to apply the just-in-time system to their manufacturing processes. These changes helped create the rapid automation of Japans automobile production system (JAMA).

To improve production line management, digital technology was introduced. The use of digital technology for specific tasks was broadened when operations went on line, in short creating the computerization of the entire manufacturing process (JAMA). New robot technologies were also gradually implemented throughout the 1970s, which removed humans from dangerous operations in the manufacturing process (JAMA).

The Japanese automobile export market grew steadily from a 51.9% share in 1965 to 73% in 1971 (JAMA). This growth was led by passenger car exports and can be credited to various factors including; the improved performance of Japanese cars, due partly to the rise of technological levels of manufacturing; competitive pricing due to cost reductions that follow mass production; and the long-term market development strategies of Japanese manufacturers.

Japan’s oil crisis in 1973 slowed years of rapid growth to a halt and greatly affected the automobile industry (JAMA). Although, despite the resulting recession, demand for Japan’s small fuel-efficient car in the United States and rapidly expanding markets in the Middle East sent Japan’s automobile exports on to a new level of international growth.

Towards the end of the 1960s Japanese manufacturers began contributing to social welfare and public interest activities through special foundations (JAMA). Manufacturers also contributed by sponsoring sport and cultural activities; and language and scholarship programs overseas.

The Japanese automobile industry has identified and is addressing issues within environmental protection and resource conservation that the industry has impacted (JAMA). This includes the further reduction of harmful motor vehicle exhaust emissions, protection of the ozone layer by discontinuing the use of CFCs and trichloroethane, increased fuel efficiency, increased efficiency in plants and infrastructure to reduce air, water and noise pollution, and the development of alternative-energy vehicles (JAMA). Recycling is also an important issue considered by the industry. New measures are constantly being implemented to improve vehicle recycling and recycling within the production process.

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